Hire Lawyers, Not Paralegals

We know that if you are facing overwhelming debt or serious criminal charges, this is an incredibly difficult, frightening time in your life.  You’re worried about your future.  With more than 45 years of combined experience in bankruptcy and criminal law, we have the knowledge and skill to give you the support you need.

 

At Horwitz & Horwitz LLC, we are dedicated to helping people facing bankruptcy and criminal charges. We can help you if you are dealing with:

Criminal Defense

 
White Collar Crime:

Crimes of this nature typically involve the theft of money from a company committed by people who have important positions in the company. Examples of white collar crimes include fraud, bribery, Ponzi schemes, insider trading, embezzlement, cybercrime, money laundering, identity theft, forgery, securities fraud, and mortgage fraud. Because such crimes often involve large amounts of money, the offenses are charged at very high felony levels and carry serious consequences.
 
DUI/OVI:

Ohio’s OVI penalties were increased with House Bill 388, known as “Annie’s Law”, effective on April 6, 2017.  OVI is a common offense, and for many people, it is their first contact with the criminal justice system.  Even a first OVI offense can have serious consequences.  When facing an OVI charge, it is critical to employ an attorney as soon as possible to assist you and protect your rights.
 
Misdemeanor Offenses:

These offenses are less serious than felony offenses, but still can have a big impact on your life and livelihood.  Nowadays, virtually all the municipal courts (where misdemeanor offenses are filed) in Southwest Ohio have websites where case information is easily accessible to the public.  Neighbors, colleagues, and prospective employers and educational institutions can access sensitive information about a person, even without a formal background check.  Thus, it is more important than even to employ an experienced attorney to protect your rights, even if the charge is “just” a misdemeanor.  An experienced attorney can evaluate and resolve the case quickly and find ways to remove the case from public view at the earliest possible opportunity.

  

Bankruptcy

 
Chapter 7:

This is what most people think of as a bankruptcy.  The debtor essentially puts all  his/her assets and debts “on the table”.  Assets are protected up to certain limits by “exemptions”.  If an asset is worth much more than the exemption, or if there is no exemption to protect the particular asset, then the bankruptcy trustee will seek to liquidate (sell) It and distribute the proceeds to the creditors.  The remaining portion of the unsecured debts are wiped out, such as credit cards and medical bills, without the requirement of paying back balances owed.  If you are faced with a foreclosure of real estate or repossession of a vehicle, you can get out from under any deficiency judgment on the balance owed after that asset is resold by the lender.
 
Chapter 13:

This is also referred to as a wage earner’s plan and enables individuals with regular income to develop a plan to repay a percentage of the current balances of their debts. The percentage paid to the creditors can be anywhere from 0-100%, depending upon disposable income after normal monthly expenses are paid. Debtors who have incomes over a median amount as determined annually per state and number of household members are presumptively considered to have income to repay their creditors some amount of disposable income.  Unless they can overcome the presumption, they are not eligible for a chapter 7.  Debtors propose a repayment plan to make installments to creditors over 3-5 years, which must then be approved by the Chapter 13 Trustee and the Judge.  Chapter 13 offers individuals a number of advantages over Chapter 7, including an opportunity to save their homes from foreclosure by paying the arrearage over the life of the plan.
 
Small Business Bankruptcy:

This usually comes up with debtors who are sole proprietors or who operate LLCs, and where the debtor has signed as a guarantor of business debts.  Businesses cannot file under chapter 13, although the individual owner or LLC member can, and the business can continue operating.  If the business is no longer generating a profit and has debts that can be enforced against the owner, this is a way for the owner to clear out the business obligations that survive the closing of the business and move on under either chapter.  An important consideration is that an owner having the major portion of his debts arising out of his business rather than his private consumer debt can file under chapter 7 even if his/her income would otherwise suggest he must be in a chapter 13.

 

We do what is best for each of our clients, and we work with integrity. What does this mean for you?

  • We put your interests first.
  • Our 2 lawyers have 45 years of combined legal experience.
  • Our firm’s attorneys handle cases from start to finish, and we are never too busy to help you. When we have reached our maximum capacity, we limit our intake of new cases.  We are not like other law firms, nor do we strive to be like other firms.
  • We do not give the work to secretaries or paralegals.
  • We do not delegate the work on your case to other, less experienced attorneys.
  • When you call, you speak to one of us.
  • We’re upfront and give straightforward advice. We never make promises we can’t keep.  We make sure that you understand the risks and benefits of all your options.
  • Our fees are reasonable. Our firm’s goal is to give you the best result possible in your case in a cost-effective manner.
  • We do advertise, but our firm’s goal is to obtain new referrals from satisfied clients. Just like any other business, the key to building a successful law practice is with satisfied customers.

 

Give us a call or request a free consultation today.  We would be glad to meet with you to talk about your unique situation.